livelymorgue:

April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

March 5, 1958: An obsolete Sherman tank, named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman and bought on surplus, was used to demolish obsolete housing at 57th Street and Broadway in New York. But it toppled the old Army barracks on top of it, and its operators were briefly trapped inside, till a “power scoop” came to free them, unhurt. Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

March 5, 1958: An obsolete Sherman tank, named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman and bought on surplus, was used to demolish obsolete housing at 57th Street and Broadway in New York. But it toppled the old Army barracks on top of it, and its operators were briefly trapped inside, till a “power scoop” came to free them, unhurt. Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

March 5, 1958: An obsolete Sherman tank, named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman and bought on surplus, was used to demolish obsolete housing at 57th Street and Broadway in New York. But it toppled the old Army barracks on top of it, and its operators were briefly trapped inside, till a “power scoop” came to free them, unhurt. Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

April 1, 1941: Less than a month after the Lend-Lease Act was signed into law, temporary shelters for workers and their families lined up by the Lincoln Memorial for inspection. All while conflict simmered in Europe — a British cruiser, the H.M.S. Voltaire, was sunk by German U-boats in the Atlantic on April 4, and soon after Hitler began bombing Bulgaria. Meanwhile, in Congress, Rep. Carl Vinson of Georgia calls for “separate investigations … into the effect of defense strikes on production.” Photo: The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

April 1, 1941: Less than a month after the Lend-Lease Act was signed into law, temporary shelters for workers and their families lined up by the Lincoln Memorial for inspection. All while conflict simmered in Europe — a British cruiser, the H.M.S. Voltaire, was sunk by German U-boats in the Atlantic on April 4, and soon after Hitler began bombing Bulgaria. Meanwhile, in Congress, Rep. Carl Vinson of Georgia calls for “separate investigations … into the effect of defense strikes on production.” Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

April 1, 1941: Less than a month after the Lend-Lease Act was signed into law, temporary shelters for workers and their families lined up by the Lincoln Memorial for inspection. All while conflict simmered in Europe — a British cruiser, the H.M.S. Voltaire, was sunk by German U-boats in the Atlantic on April 4, and soon after Hitler began bombing Bulgaria. Meanwhile, in Congress, Rep. Carl Vinson of Georgia calls for “separate investigations … into the effect of defense strikes on production.” Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

“Education is our business,” averred Walter J. Sutcliffe, chief commander of the United States Power Squadrons, in the paper of Jan. 19, 1964. And so, William Stein gave a demonstration of the effects of wind on a sail, using an electric fan. “We want to help and serve the person who wants to make sure that what he is doing on the water with his boat is correct,” Mr. Sutcliffe wrote. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

“Education is our business,” averred Walter J. Sutcliffe, chief commander of the United States Power Squadrons, in the paper of Jan. 19, 1964. And so, William Stein gave a demonstration of the effects of wind on a sail, using an electric fan. “We want to help and serve the person who wants to make sure that what he is doing on the water with his boat is correct,” Mr. Sutcliffe wrote. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

“Education is our business,” averred Walter J. Sutcliffe, chief commander of the United States Power Squadrons, in the paper of Jan. 19, 1964. And so, William Stein gave a demonstration of the effects of wind on a sail, using an electric fan. “We want to help and serve the person who wants to make sure that what he is doing on the water with his boat is correct,” Mr. Sutcliffe wrote. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

Feb. 14., 1961: Underneath 51st Street and Fifth Avenue, Lacey Wilson and Herman Humes coated a water main with concrete to prevent it from breaking or bursting. “The main, built before 1870 — the city’s records on water installations are incomplete before that date — is similar to the one on Central Park West near 102nd Street that burst and caused widespread flooding Jan. 12,” wrote Charles G. Bennett. Photo: Larry Morris/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

Feb. 14., 1961: Underneath 51st Street and Fifth Avenue, Lacey Wilson and Herman Humes coated a water main with concrete to prevent it from breaking or bursting. “The main, built before 1870 — the city’s records on water installations are incomplete before that date — is similar to the one on Central Park West near 102nd Street that burst and caused widespread flooding Jan. 12,” wrote Charles G. Bennett. Photo: Larry Morris/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

Feb. 14., 1961: Underneath 51st Street and Fifth Avenue, Lacey Wilson and Herman Humes coated a water main with concrete to prevent it from breaking or bursting. “The main, built before 1870 — the city’s records on water installations are incomplete before that date — is similar to the one on Central Park West near 102nd Street that burst and caused widespread flooding Jan. 12,” wrote Charles G. Bennett. Photo: Larry Morris/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

In the Sunday magazine of May 18, 1952: “Without noticeable discomfort, daring young man pushes a flaming torch down his throat.” In other news from the paper of record on that date: “Atomic Blast Delayed Again,” “Moths Attack Congress Carpets” and “Czechs Denounce Scouts as Bourgeois Diversion.” Photo: Henry Ries/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

In the Sunday magazine of May 18, 1952: “Without noticeable discomfort, daring young man pushes a flaming torch down his throat.” In other news from the paper of record on that date: “Atomic Blast Delayed Again,” “Moths Attack Congress Carpets” and “Czechs Denounce Scouts as Bourgeois Diversion.” Photo: Henry Ries/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

In the Sunday magazine of May 18, 1952: “Without noticeable discomfort, daring young man pushes a flaming torch down his throat.” In other news from the paper of record on that date: “Atomic Blast Delayed Again,” “Moths Attack Congress Carpets” and “Czechs Denounce Scouts as Bourgeois Diversion.” Photo: Henry Ries/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

Jan. 11, 1942: After days of temperatures like 4.8 or 6.9 degrees, a brief respite from the cold spell sent folks outdoors for the weekend, like this skater in Central Park, who was rescued from a spill by a danger sign. Photo: The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

Jan. 11, 1942: After days of temperatures like 4.8 or 6.9 degrees, a brief respite from the cold spell sent folks outdoors for the weekend, like this skater in Central Park, who was rescued from a spill by a danger sign. Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

Jan. 11, 1942: After days of temperatures like 4.8 or 6.9 degrees, a brief respite from the cold spell sent folks outdoors for the weekend, like this skater in Central Park, who was rescued from a spill by a danger sign. Photo: The New York Times

livelymorgue:

The heat of July 1954 did not stop these intrepid tourists from making a go of it in the city. In the days leading to July 21, when the photo was taken, food crops had been destroyed, storms had killed 10 and an eclipse was obscured by clouds in Ontario. And in Brooklyn, at a mobile animal clinic for checkups, neighborhood pets were affected, too. Reported The Times: “These dog days shouldn’t happen to a dog. Especially a fat dog, and there are a lot of those.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

The heat of July 1954 did not stop these intrepid tourists from making a go of it in the city. In the days leading to July 21, when the photo was taken, food crops had been destroyed, storms had killed 10 and an eclipse was obscured by clouds in Ontario. And in Brooklyn, at a mobile animal clinic for checkups, neighborhood pets were affected, too. Reported The Times: “These dog days shouldn’t happen to a dog. Especially a fat dog, and there are a lot of those.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

The heat of July 1954 did not stop these intrepid tourists from making a go of it in the city. In the days leading to July 21, when the photo was taken, food crops had been destroyed, storms had killed 10 and an eclipse was obscured by clouds in Ontario. And in Brooklyn, at a mobile animal clinic for checkups, neighborhood pets were affected, too. Reported The Times: “These dog days shouldn’t happen to a dog. Especially a fat dog, and there are a lot of those.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

A Nov. 28, 1973, article described a 40 percent rise in tourism in New York over a similar period the previous year, most of it from Europe, like this tourist, armed with two cameras and a cigarette. “Travel agents say that stories about the dangers of New York have been built up and exaggerated in the European press,” reported Deirdre Carmody, but visitors are hardly deterred. “They come here petrified,” the story quoted Bruce Velsor, executive director of Travellers International, as saying, “but the urge to come here overcomes the fear.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times 
livelymorgue:

A Nov. 28, 1973, article described a 40 percent rise in tourism in New York over a similar period the previous year, most of it from Europe, like this tourist, armed with two cameras and a cigarette. “Travel agents say that stories about the dangers of New York have been built up and exaggerated in the European press,” reported Deirdre Carmody, but visitors are hardly deterred. “They come here petrified,” the story quoted Bruce Velsor, executive director of Travellers International, as saying, “but the urge to come here overcomes the fear.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

A Nov. 28, 1973, article described a 40 percent rise in tourism in New York over a similar period the previous year, most of it from Europe, like this tourist, armed with two cameras and a cigarette. “Travel agents say that stories about the dangers of New York have been built up and exaggerated in the European press,” reported Deirdre Carmody, but visitors are hardly deterred. “They come here petrified,” the story quoted Bruce Velsor, executive director of Travellers International, as saying, “but the urge to come here overcomes the fear.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

April 20, 1960: A boy observed a tired tiger in the Central Park Zoo. That summer, former Gov. Herbert H. Lehman of New York gave the city $500,000 to build an adjacent zoo for kids, full of “peaceful animals that children are fond of: rabbits, ducks, geese, doves, lambs, calves, pigs, baby deer, llamas, goats and perhaps even a talking crow.” Unlike the normal, “adult” zoo, stands would sell food for the animals so that the children could “hand-feed and pet the tame creatures.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times livelymorgue:

April 20, 1960: A boy observed a tired tiger in the Central Park Zoo. That summer, former Gov. Herbert H. Lehman of New York gave the city $500,000 to build an adjacent zoo for kids, full of “peaceful animals that children are fond of: rabbits, ducks, geese, doves, lambs, calves, pigs, baby deer, llamas, goats and perhaps even a talking crow.” Unlike the normal, “adult” zoo, stands would sell food for the animals so that the children could “hand-feed and pet the tame creatures.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

livelymorgue:

April 20, 1960: A boy observed a tired tiger in the Central Park Zoo. That summer, former Gov. Herbert H. Lehman of New York gave the city $500,000 to build an adjacent zoo for kids, full of “peaceful animals that children are fond of: rabbits, ducks, geese, doves, lambs, calves, pigs, baby deer, llamas, goats and perhaps even a talking crow.” Unlike the normal, “adult” zoo, stands would sell food for the animals so that the children could “hand-feed and pet the tame creatures.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times